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AIRPLANE LIGHTNING PROTECTION


Most aircraft do not fly into lightning storms, or fly through storms or areas where lightning is likely to be present. What we see as lightning is really a massive flood of electrons seeking equilibrium, either from cloud-cloud or from cloud-ground. In both cases, huge amounts of electric charge build up at the edges of the cloud. The electricity finds it's way from one place to the other via what's called a "step leader".continue..


Lightning strikes on transport aircraft happen periodically depending on many parameters including atmospheric conditions and operational characteristics of the airplane. Most recent nacelle fleet history, circa 2002-2005, has shown that lightning strike damage has occurred more frequently on shorter mission commercial aircraft equipped with composite panels than prior configurations of nacelle panels. It should be noted that the greatest frequency of reported lightning strike damage on composite nacelle structure occurred along the Midwestern corridor of the continental United States.continue..

NASA’s work in advanced aeronautics includes growing interest in environmentally responsive aircraft, one component of which involves use of composites to significantly reduce weight and, hence, fuel consumption. The new Boeing 787 aircraft is one recent example, and there has been a strong move toward composites in new general aviation and business jet aircraft. One disadvantage of this new direction is that the aircraft are far more vulnerable to lightning strikes. The energy deposited in a typical lightning strike involves tens of KV and 10,000-200,000 amperes, occurring in a fraction of a second. Without some type of shielding, or conductive path, the electrically insulated carbon fiber/ epoxy composites can be damaged, particularly at the entry and exit points for the strike. The aircraft instrumentation can also be damaged in such an event and extra shielding is often necessary for composite aircraft.continue..

Most aircraft do not fly into lightning storms, or fly through storms or areas where lightning is likely to be present. What we see as lightning is really a massive flood of electrons seeking equilibrium, either from cloud-cloud or from cloud-ground. In both cases, huge amounts of electric charge build up at the edges of the cloud. The electricity finds it's way from one place to the other via what's called a "step leader".continue..

1 comment:

  1. A very impressive content based on Lightning Protection which meets all today's requirements. Now the trend has come to move toward Lightning Protection system .

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