SEARCH YOUR TOPIC HERE!

CONDUCTANCE, ADMITTANCE, SUSCEPTANCE


Conductance is a unique electrical measurement that determines the ability of a battery to transmit current through its internal structure. As such, it gives a direct relationship to battery power. Internal conductive battery components include battery grids, active material and connectors that conduct electronic current as well as sulfuric acid electrolyte that conducts ionic current between and within the plates and plate separators.

When students first see the parallel resistance equation, the natural question to ask is, "Where did that thing come from?" It is truly an odd piece of arithmetic, and its origin deserves a good explanation. Resistance, by definition, is the measure of friction a component presents to the flow of electrons through it. Resistance is symbolized by the capital letter "R" and is measured in the unit of "ohm." However, we can also think of this electrical property in terms of its inverse: how easy it is for electrons to flow through a component, rather than how difficult. If resistance is the word we use to symbolize the measure of how difficult it is for electrons to flow, then a good word to express how easy it is for electrons to flow would be conductance.
Mathematically, conductance is the reciprocal, or inverse, of resistance...

In electrical engineering, the admittance (Y) is a measure of how easily a circuit or device will allow a current to flow. It is defined as the inverse of the impedance (Z). The SI unit of admittance is the siemens (symbol S). Oliver Heaviside coined the term in December 1887.

In electrical engineering, the admittance (Y) is the inverse of the impedance (Z). The SI unit of admittance is the siemens. Oliver Heaviside coined the term in December 1887.Admittance is a measure of how much current is admitted in a circuit. The admittance has its most obvious utility in dealing with parallel AC 

If you studied Resistance, Reactance, and Impedance, then you have a pretty good start in the basics of opposition to electric current. However, these three forces each have a twin, which is essentially their opposite. While resistance, reactance, and impedance all tend to restrict how much electricity can flow through a certain path, conductance, susceptance, and admittance are all forces that tend to allow electricity to flow. And there's good news: All of these forces are quite easy to understand and mathematically calculate.

1 comment: